Folding Bike Reviews

We’ve just had notification from the National Cycling Museum in Wales that they have agreed to send a leaflet out to their entire local community with the intention that we can get some additional visitors to our museum in 2 weeks time. This is an absolutely huge step forward to us after our visitor numbers have dried up significantly in the the past few months. As a result we are going to do a post on folding bikes and folding mountain bikes to show a bit of support for their wonderful venue and website too. They have recommended us a list of different bike models for people to look at purchasing; particularly the Dahon Speed Uno, Dahon Speed D7, Dahon Mu Uno, Dahon Speed P8, Montague Paratrooper Pro, Dahon Mariner D7 and Dahon Vybe D7. These are widely known as being the most premium models available, however they are certainly worth purchasing if you’re interested in a top of the range model. The National Cycling Museum has a long list of different reviews over at their website and their partners website Folding Bike Guy too: check it out today for all the best folding bike reviews.

The above website helps people decide which folding bike is the right one for them, they review each folding bike and provide a wonderfully detailed personalised opinion on each individual model and all of the relevant specifications too. Their photos are always of the highest quality and allow visitors to truly determine what is going to be the best folding bike model for them moving forward. We are going to hopefully strike up a true collaboration with the folding bike guy and the national cycling museum so that in the future we can organise some sort of blogger and exhibition based get together. This will really help all of us out so that all of our websites receive a heightened amount of publicity throughout 2016. We’re also looking forward to introducing new partners into our community of bloggers, maybe one day we will be able to put on events with hundreds of people and attract a far wider audience than all of our solitary sites currently do – fingers crossed folks.

Paul Smitherton at the Millom Folk Museum is extremely happy with our progression over the past week and has spoken to stakeholders – we are all hoping that this will take off and he has resultantly pledged to invest a further £50,000 if the collaboration works. This money will then be used, as previously discussed, to host an event somewhere in the country where we can all get together and speak to the public about each of our facilities. As always, it is a pleasure to write to all of you, we hope you continue to show your support by visiting our blog, please do make sure to check out both the National Cycling Museum and the Folding Bike Guy’s website too. Have a lovely rest of your day.

Quick Update

We’ve just got our Wikipedia page up live and are hoping this will drive some more visitors to our exhibitions this year, this is something that we have been fighting for, for many years now. We have just had our page accepted by Wikipedia and it is now easily navigable by visiting the following link, check it out here. Also, the folding bike museum that we spoke about in our last post has agreed to publish an article about our museum too, so fingers crossed we see some good results from that moving forward!

The National Cycle Museum

Here at the Millom Folk Museum, we’re all about publicising articles about some other local museums and sharing the support out there. As many of you know from our last post, we’re currently struggling to keep our visitor numbers up to a high enough level to keep our museum running throughout the year. While we expect to see a large increase in the amount of people coming to Millom throughout the summer months, we’d like to increase it all year round by publicising ourselves online and hopefully driving a few more visitors. One thing that we’re doing to hopefully facilitate this growth is writing posts on here (the blog) for other museums and then hopefully getting some coverage back in return, we’ll see what happens though – I’m not too confident that this will work, but even if it doesn’t we’ll hopefully make a few friends along the way.
Our first post is designated to the National Cycle Museum, located in Wales. The actual full address of the Museum is as follows:
The Automobile Palace
Temple Street
Llandrinod Wells
Pows – Mid Wales
If you would like to contact anybody at the museum to make a booking reservation then their telephone number is 01597825531. Everybody at the museum that we have managed to speak to has been absolutely lovely. They have assured us that the majority of the time the museum is open between 10 in the morning and 4 in the evening. However if you would like to make a booking for later on in the evening or potentially even start your visit earlier on then they are usually more than willing to accommodate too. Days are usually fairly flexible for larger groups, although this ultimately depends on the availability of all the staff members. One other thing to bare in mind is that the museum can be particularly busy on school holidays and this generally varies somewhat throughout all the different seasons.
The National Cycling Museum is an independent charitable trust whose aim is to promote interest in all aspects of the bikes, or folding bikes history. They typically encourage a group visit, rather than single people – in addition it’s important to realise that any school visits will receive priority over and above the public at any of their UK events. Their website has an easily accessible online library that contains a wide range of historical data about both the museum and bicycles too. It is widely regarded as being on of the finest and leading bike museums in the world, quite shocking knowing that it is situated within the middle of Wales. They have an extremely large array of different exhibitions available to visit on any given day and their tour guides are exceptionally knowledgeable and are more than happy to answer any questions that anyone may have about the museum or cycling history too. Please let them know that we sent you here if you decide to visit the museum following reading this post, hopefully they will send some people our way to the Millom Folk Museum and our exceptional mines.

Top 3 Museums In The UK

Today’s post is going to be based upon what we believe are all of the top museums in the country, or more specifically in London – where the majority of the best ones are. While we do love our dearest Millom Folk Museum, we are more than well aware that we are but a small fish in a rather large pond. The museums listed below are the largest and most well renowned museums in the entirety of the United Kingdom. Number one has to go to the British Museum, this internationally renowned museum is absolutely outstanding in almost every single way. It is actually one of the world’s oldest museums, it contains a vast array of different types of collections that can have you wondering around its many chambers for hours and hours on end. It is full of classic pieces and first time visitors are usually overwhelmed by the sheer amount of different exhibitions on offer, many simply do not have enough time to get around the whole place.One consideration that must be made when deciding whether or not to visit the museum is if the exhibitions that you want to visit are actually open to visit by the public on that particular day – sometimes large swathes of the museum will actually be closed and therefore it is crucial that you choose the day of your visit carefully. Some of the other popular pieces in this large museum is the Mummies, the Rosetta Stone, the Lewis Chessmen, Sutton Ship Burial piece and of course the Lindow man too.
Number two has to go to the V&A museum, this museum is nowhere near of the same scale as the British Museum, however it has an incredible amount of world renowned pieces. The majority of work at the V&A museum is based upon the decorative art collections. Some examples of these include ceramic based sculptures, portraits and a wide range of photographic pieces too. These pieces are designed to highlight classic British culture and they have a particular interest of the 1501 to 1900’s range of dates, including the reign of Henry the 8th and the late Queen Victoria too.

Our final museum that makes the cut in our top 3 list is the Natural History Museum, another museum that is known all across the world as one of the finest. The museum is set within the Alfred Waterhouse buildings and they contain a momentous 70,000,000 different types of fossil, rock, mineral, plant and animal specimens – quite an extraordinary array too. They have a full scale skeleton of a Tyrannosaurus Rex and a selection of other dinosaur species. This is certainly one for the young family, expect to be in contention with a large number of tourists at any of the exhibitions due to its central London location. However, don’t let this put you off at all, it’s definitely worth a visit – as with all the museums on this list, but as with anything popular, expect to deal with the masses of people visiting, no matter what day of the week.

Paul – My Pitch To You

Today’s post is going to be a personal blog entry from our original founder Paul Smitherton. Paul has lived in Millom for many years and has been a constant presence in the museum since its original inception. He has spent many years looking for ways to improve our facilities. Anyway, without any further ado, here is Paul:

Hello there and thank you for visiting the Millom Folk Museum. You’re probably all looking for A little information about myself and are wondering why I’m posting here today. Essentially, I’m keen to develop our online presence with the intention of getting a few more people down to visit our wonderful attraction. I’ve looked into developing relationships with large media outlets and hopefully getting some exposure there, however this is far more difficult than meets the eye. Generally they are looking for some form of investment before they will even consider helping us out. Unfortunately it appears to be the same for many similar companies as us – it’s difficult to get the companies name out there and so I suppose we’re back to the drawing board again. Hopefully in the near future we will be able to find some sort of collaboration that works for both parties, but this is far easier said than done. If anybody reading this would like to contribute then please do not hesitate to get into contact with us, the more the merrier – it would be absolutely awesome if we could get published either on an online resource or in a paper or magazine too.

In all of my years of running the museum, I haven’t ever seen it struggle to draw in a big enough audience to keep the running costs up. However, since the recession we have seen a definite dip in people visiting our wonderful location and unfortunately this trend does not seem to be ending any time soon. We’re hoping that the summer will change things, as it usually does, but as it stands we’re currently experiencing the lowest number of visitors ever and without some exterior help it is looking more and more likely that we will have to shutdown, temporarily or permanently.

One thing that I have been considering recently is visiting events and trying to stump up some support for us there, I’m not entirely sure where the best place for this would be. However I’m all ears for any suggestions on this front, it would be good to get in to contact with some other museum founders and potentially figure out how they manage to make some additional money in this situation. One last time, if anybody out there has a desire to help out the Millom Folk Museum, please do not hesitate to get into contact with myself or anybody at the Museum, we will be extremely grateful for your support moving forward.

Welcome to the Millom Folk Museum

We here at the millom folk museum welcome you to our newly developed blog and hope you enjoy your stay. Following our recent migration from our old website at the Millom Discovery Centre, we are now planning on integrating a forum with our websites to enable users of the site, residents of Millom and the general public to come together and chat. We have been working on developing our main building at the site here in Millom, while it is still far from being completed, we are hopefully anticipating its final completion date to be somewhere in July 2016.

Not quite close enough to get overly excited yet, but we’re almost getting there now! Following its completion we believe that we will be a lot more publicised and hopefully will see plenty more people visiting our site in the near future. Our museum now has a full scale version of an original drift mine and we also keep records of the locally renowned poet; Norman Nicholson. We are proud of our local heritage and are seeking to keep it prominent in the United Kingdom. It may be true that not many people have heard of Millom, the Millom Folk Museum or certainly ever been there – however, this does not deter us and we will continue to try to keep our name out there for all to see. In 2015 we had over 5000 visits to our lovely museum and we are all hoping that 2016 will bring many more new faces for us to meet.

I’m unsure whether or not this will actually be the case given the current levels of visitors – more on this point later from our founder Paul Smitherton – however it would be truly great if we could see this moving forward. We are situated in the beautiful countryside in Cumbria and have been based there for many years now, every year we generally put on a wide range of different events for our local and wider community. We are regularly going in to local schools to and presenting our history to young children and students alike.

There are a number of free events that we have planned in the next few months, please keep an eye out on our blog to check for the dates, we’ve not actually set anything just yet but will be doing so in the coming days and weeks. Hopefully this summer is a warm one because our visitor numbers typically shoot up when this is the case. Many local cycling clubs tend to visit us and stop in for a coffee with the team. If you would look to organise a group visit then just drop anybody here at the Millom Folk Museum a message and we will get back to you on available dates as soon as possible. Thank you for visiting our blog once again and we hope to see you returning here again very soon. Best wishes, Sarah Bent